Napa and Solano Counties Central Labor Council

 

Despite its setbacks, or perhaps because of them, organized labor has an energy level that AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka says he hasn’t seen before in his 50 years with the movement.

Siblings, our 11th annual Labor Day Breakfast will be held Monday September 2nd and as always our Sibs at the Ironworkers Local #37

Take Action

Recently introduced legislation would provide needed protections for health care and social services workers from violence on the job. Tell Congress to support an OSHA workplace violence standard.

This month, 21,000 working people at AT&T’s wireless division voted to authorize a strike. It wasn’t an easy choice.

No one wants to go on strike, but they needed to send a message to AT&T because the company is demanding workers do more work for less. Despite making $13 billion in profits last year—and record profits in its wireless division—AT&T has cut more than 8,000 call center jobs and outsourced many of those jobs to low-wage countries.

The company is refusing to stop outsourcing jobs and demanding cuts to benefits. We cannot allow this blatant corporate greed to go unchecked.

Sign the petition immediately to AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson demanding good jobs for working people at AT&T and an end to outsourcing.

The petition to AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson says the following:

I support good jobs and a fair union contract for working people at AT&T Mobility and across your company. The working people at AT&T Mobility helped AT&T earn record profits last year, yet they have seen their commissions cut and health care costs rise.

You met with President Trump recently and discussed how AT&T can help “stimulate job creation in America,” yet you chose to close more than 20 call centers and eliminate more than 8,000 call center jobs in recent years. Some of that work you sent overseas.

You have also outsourced the majority of your retail stores to low-wage third-party dealers, undermining the standards of your own retail employees. If you care about creating good jobs in America, start with your own company.

AT&T’s greed is bad news not only for workers at the company, but for our communities. If AT&T executives are able to get away with this, it will embolden other corporate CEOs to do the same.

AT&T was able to turn a massive profit last year because of the hard work and quality service of retail store workers, call centers representatives and technicians. Instead of sharing in the profits, AT&T seems determined to continue to keep the big compensation packages flowing to its executives, while forcing working people to sacrifice more and more.

Not only do company executives want free rein to outsource more jobs, but they want to force employees to pay more for medical benefits, cut retirement benefits and even reduce employee sick time. Not on our watch.

Add your name immediately to the petition to demand good jobs for working people at AT&T.

In Solidarity,

Rachel Warino
California Labor Federation

Recent News

Until last week, Li Zilles was one of the many nameless and faceless contractors toiling in the bowels of the internet, providing online services that might have been mistaken for the work of artificial intelligence.

The job: to transcribe audio files for the start-up Rev.com, churning out texts without clients ever knowing the name of the transcriber.

This was a lonely existence, and not an easy one. The pay, even though the work was full-time, was little enough that food stamps became necessary.

When the global economy shifted in the late 19th century, working people were the first to adapt. They moved to cities like Cincinnati, Cleveland, and Toledo, Ohio, and worked long hours in unsafe factories. They drove the Industrial Revolution and changed the nature of work forever. When it became clear that employers were exploiting their productivity, the labor movement formed to protest abuses like sweatshops, child labor, and poverty wages.

On September 13 more than a hundred activists participated in a bicoastal protest at Palantir’s two headquarters, in New York City and in Palo Alto, California. The intent of the protest was to bring awareness to the tech company’s involvement with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), which Palantir provides with data-mining software that’s been used to screen undocumented immigrants and plan raids.

When the global economy shifted in the late 19th century, working people were the first to adapt. They moved to cities like Cincinnati, Cleveland, and Toledo, Ohio, and worked long hours in unsafe factories. They drove the Industrial Revolution and changed the nature of work forever.