Napa and Solano Counties Central Labor Council

 

On Feb. 15, just days after massive layoffs at Activision Blizzard, the AFL-CIO issued a powerful public statement of support to game developers in the United States. Its message, published in an open letter at Kotaku, was both simple and profound.

Last year, in communities all across the country, millions of Americans mobilized and called for an economy that works for all of us.

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Tell Congress to repeal the tax cuts for the wealthy and corporations instead of cutting the vital programs that benefit nearly one-third of the U.S. population.

This month, 21,000 working people at AT&T’s wireless division voted to authorize a strike. It wasn’t an easy choice.

No one wants to go on strike, but they needed to send a message to AT&T because the company is demanding workers do more work for less. Despite making $13 billion in profits last year—and record profits in its wireless division—AT&T has cut more than 8,000 call center jobs and outsourced many of those jobs to low-wage countries.

The company is refusing to stop outsourcing jobs and demanding cuts to benefits. We cannot allow this blatant corporate greed to go unchecked.

Sign the petition immediately to AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson demanding good jobs for working people at AT&T and an end to outsourcing.

The petition to AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson says the following:

I support good jobs and a fair union contract for working people at AT&T Mobility and across your company. The working people at AT&T Mobility helped AT&T earn record profits last year, yet they have seen their commissions cut and health care costs rise.

You met with President Trump recently and discussed how AT&T can help “stimulate job creation in America,” yet you chose to close more than 20 call centers and eliminate more than 8,000 call center jobs in recent years. Some of that work you sent overseas.

You have also outsourced the majority of your retail stores to low-wage third-party dealers, undermining the standards of your own retail employees. If you care about creating good jobs in America, start with your own company.

AT&T’s greed is bad news not only for workers at the company, but for our communities. If AT&T executives are able to get away with this, it will embolden other corporate CEOs to do the same.

AT&T was able to turn a massive profit last year because of the hard work and quality service of retail store workers, call centers representatives and technicians. Instead of sharing in the profits, AT&T seems determined to continue to keep the big compensation packages flowing to its executives, while forcing working people to sacrifice more and more.

Not only do company executives want free rein to outsource more jobs, but they want to force employees to pay more for medical benefits, cut retirement benefits and even reduce employee sick time. Not on our watch.

Add your name immediately to the petition to demand good jobs for working people at AT&T.

In Solidarity,

Rachel Warino
California Labor Federation

Recent News

“I’m not anti-union, but I don’t really think we need them, right?” said Double Fine head Tim Schafer while hosting yesterday evening’s Game Developers Choice Awards in San Francisco. “We’re all great here and in this show. No one here is union and...” Then the stage lights went out.

“Oh, right,” said Schafer after the lights went out. “Except for the lighting crew. I forgot they’re all union.”

A four-year fight to expand overtime pay to millions of workers may soon be over. About 1.2 million workers will win and 2.8 million will lose.

The Department of Labor is scaling back an Obama-era rule that would have doubled the maximum salary for a worker to qualify for overtime pay, according to a proposed rule the agency sent to the Office of the Federal Register for public review.

In speeches and in press releases over the last year, AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka has pointed out that unions are uniquely qualified by their very nature to lead the country out of what he has called a “dark period,” a time when hateful speech and vitriol emanate from the White House and are found in abundance everywhere else. Unions, he notes, bring together all kinds of people in a fight that is common to the vast majority, a fight for a better life for oneself and for the next generation.

Black leaders, activists, and organizers formed the backbone of the U.S. labor movement. Even when the forces of structural racism and segregation sought to stifle their contributions, their resolve to fight for workers’ rights alongside the cause of civil rights remained unshakable. Black women, in particular, have played an enormous role in the movement’s legacy and development.